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Sunday Editorial:Lazy reflections on special status and the state of Indian politics!

  By Ratnakar Tripathy   Thinking Indian politics! Lazy is Sunday. Thus this! It remains a matter of debate whether Bihar will gain much from its impending special status. I will stay away from this debate as a sensible layman. But it does indicate two important things to me – a perception that all Bihar needs from the centre is a special package and Bihar will take care of itself rest of the time. This is no longer unique to Bihar. Several other states have turned inwards in the awareness that the centre is basically incapable of doing much for them. This is a sign of the changing... 

Sunday Editorial:100 years of Indian cinema, intimately speaking!

By Ratnakar Tripathy Talking eyes: cinema sync To start with a warning, please do not expect me to recount the 100 year tale in any detail. All I know is I turned cinema-crazy quite early, had my first black and white crushes on Nutan, Mala Sinha and a few other aunties at the age of eight and found myself among the milling masses of devotees. This was a sure contrast with how it went with my literary-minded friends during adolescence in school. It was a small tight club of boys in a boarding school who shared a mystic bond – the bond of the written word and also the malicious joys generated... 

Sunday Editorial – The joys of the big screen: will they come back again?

By Ratnakar Tripathy More and more awesome: on the pocket? Every time I hear from a young or old friend they watched a ‘great’ film on their laptops, I react with pity not envy. Like a great part of humanity, I feel that the big screen experience, whether 35 mm or 70 mm is something very special. It enables you to see the world within and without to depths that a small screen ranging between a gigantic TV screen to a mobile phone display will never match. The reasons are just too visceral and related to the way the human senses and the brain work, although it is possible to enumerate... 

Sunday Editorial – India hurting: is India a country of ‘hurt sentiments’?

    I am hurt: like it or lump it! The title is rhetorical. India is not hurting nor is it a country of ‘hurt sentiments’, nor a wounded civilization, not for the 99.99 per cent of its denizens. But there are these small and large groups of the vigilante and the self-appointed vanguard of communities, religions, castes, regions, languages and races who are ever willing to claim hurt. Most of them as a rule are bullies, hoodlums and conspirators making trouble as a chosen way of life and career. For example, when a Dalit college prof in Dhule, Maharshtra gets beaten up by goons for... 

Sunday Editorial – Between faith and music: the quarrel and the harmony!

By Ratnakar Tripathy ‘The God above': Bhimsen Joshi seems to suggest My earliest memories of religious music are rather traumatic. Way back when I must have been seven or eight years old! I remember from my summer vacations, my grandfather would shake up and wake up the whole household with his Tulsidas bhajans, sung on top of his lungs, while still lying in the bed. This went on for a whole hour. When I complained to my father, who had a decent singing voice, enhanced by a good control over his soundbox, he said lamely with an insincere look on his face ‘it’s the passion of faith behind... 

Sunday Editorial -In the company of ex-gods in Patna: Sunday across the river!

By Ratnakar Tripathy Misty warmth of the ex-Gods! The most boring and vacuous form of solitude is to shut oneself in one’s room on a Sunday and avoid human voices and faces. And it sounds too much like the sulk of loneliness. I am not even sure if this kind of solitude-cum-loneliness refreshes you at all or helps to face the stress of the coming week. It seems a good idea instead to take a book to the terrace and recline in an easy chair, losing yourself to the book and soon enough to the luxury of drowsiness, when the fingers lose the grip and the book slips to the floor.  Hurrah, too much... 

Sunday Editorial- Aam Admi Party [AAP]: story of a proud mango!

by Ratnakar Tripathy Kejriwal: ‘wake up mango man!’ Even as Arvind Kejriwal named his party Aam Aadmi (common man) Party, there is already a page on it in Wikipedia with some basic information. In reaction, ready with statistics and sarcasm, Congress leader and Information and Broadcasting Minister Manish Tewari told reporters ‘There are 1453 political parties registered with the Election Commission. So, if one more is added, this will only strengthen our democratic fabric’. The bad joke continued as he said ‘The Aam Aadmi (common man) is synonymous with the Congress since 1885... 

Sunday Editorial- Why we Indians make great disaster management experts: thought of the day/decade!

 by Ratnakar Tripathy Break bridges: arrange boats Because disasters have an affinity for us? No, even though many of us resignedly believe so. Or we are prone, as some of us shamefacedly but boldly admit? No, and I don’t mind revealing for once the moral of the story, even before telling the tale. The moral is plain and simple and deserves to be put in caps [capitals], but I am putting down the moral without them since too many caps and underlining and highlighting simply allow and enable us to ignore. First, we create a disaster through laziness and inaction. Then faced with the consequences,... 

Sunday Editorial-Travel advisory for NRBs: don’t count flyovers, talk to people!

Let your Buddha laugh! Sunday Editorial by Ratnakar Tripathy Dear Non-resident Biharis, Next time you come to Bihar, don’t waste your time counting the new flyovers or hanging around in your Bermudas in the new shopping, malls looking your affluent NR best! Talk to people! In particular the oldest and the youngest. Spend some time with a 15 year old niece or a 74 year old uncle if you really wish to get a measure of the change and its ratcheting pace. Avoid intellectuals and their tight-jawed bytes, especially the local substitutes of your metropolitan ones who get their reading lists and latest... 

Sunday Editorial -The brute realism of Hindi cinema: tales from Vaishali

Sunday Editorial The brute realism of Hindi cinema: tales from Vaishali By Ratnakar Tripathy Unreal life: real romance? That Hindi films belong to the world of unreality is an established cliché, an obvious assumption as well as conclusion that no longer awaits arguments defending it. But this fantasy world has its own hard-edged side that we often miss. Here is how it works. In a village or a small town, not enjoying the privilege of anonymity, any plans for indulging in romance get hexed on all sides. Most often when you wish to romance someone from your own caste, you are told, you are practicing... 
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